Posts tagged ‘Capital Gains Tax’

HMRC has had much success in collecting large amounts of tax from property related tax investigations recently, giving them more impetus to continue to challenge investors.

In particular, the widely used claim for PPR (Principal Private Residence) relief which significantly reduces exposure to Capital Gains Tax has been making headlines following a high profile debate about MP’s expenses.

Making a house a home

There+s+no+place+like+home_9d95e3_4741424In order to be eligible for PPR relief, you must be able to demonstrate that the investment property was your home at some point during your ownership.

The term “home” is key here, merely paying council tax and redirecting some of your post simply is not enough.  HMRC may require evidence that your personal artefacts were present enabling you to reside in the property with “home” comforts, but of course what makes a house a home is a very subjective matter.

Evidence

Perhaps the current trend of sharing your personal life on Social Media, will become useful after all?

Flipping and switching

If you are what’s known as a “property flipper” (regularly buying, refurbishing and selling on) or have elected to change your principal residence from one property to another, which you are perfectly entitled to, be warned that you may be putting your head above the proverbial parapet.

Protect your eligibility

If you need advice on how to ensure you get the very valuable PPR relief, then please feel free to get in touch.

 

The information provided in this blog illustrates my opinions and experiences, it does not constitute advice and I do not accept responsibility for any actions taken or refrained from as a result of reading this post.

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The new Chancellor, George Osborne  delivered his first budget on 22 June 2010. He said his budget was ‘tough  but fair’ but described it as being ‘unavoidable’ due to ‘the years of debt and spending’ by the previous labour government.

News PhotoThe Chancellor’s package included various tax increases and spending cuts, some measures had been widely anticipated such as the increase in the VAT rate and an increase in Capital Gains Tax. The Chancellor stressed that his measures were intended to be fair ‘Everyone will pay something but the people at the bottom of the income scale will pay proportionately less than those at the top’.


As tax is not my preferred subject (I have highly experienced colleagues for dealing with that!) I will be brief:

The key announcements included:

VAT Rate rise – As anticipated the VAT rate will increase from 17.5% to 20% with effect from 4 January 2011.

Personal Allowance increase – The personal income tax allowance is to increase by £1,000 in April 2011 to £7,475. This is worth £200 a year to a basic rate taxpayer.

Capital Gains Tax increase – The Capital Gains Tax rate for higher rate taxpayers will increased from 18% to 28% from 23 June 2010. It remains at 18% for basic rate tax payers.

Entrepreneurs Relief extended – Entrepreneurs relief has been extended to a rate of 10% on the first £5m of gains as opposed to the first £2m.

Corporation Tax Rate cut – The Corporation Tax rate will be cut by 1% each year over the next four years until it reaches 24%. The Small Companies rate is to be cut to 20%.

National Insurance rise to stay – The National Insurance rate increases announced by labour remained intact and will still take place however the threshold at which employers start to pay will rise.

No change to Cigarettes, Alcohol and Fuel – No changes were made to duty on cigarettes, alcohol or fuel and the plan to increase the duty on cider from July was scrapped.

Freeze on Child Benefits – Child benefit is to be frozen for the next three years.

Changes to Tax Credits – Tax credits will reduce for families earning over £40,000 next year but for low income families they will receive more Child Tax Credit with the amount per child increasing by £150 above the rate of inflation.

State Pensions – The state pension is to be linked to earnings from April 2011 and is guaranteed to rise in line with earnings or 2.5% whichever is greater. The increase in the state pension age to 66 is to be accelerated.

For further details on the key announcements download a copy of our budget summary.

Alternatively come along to one of our Budget Seminars which we are holding on the 24th and 25th June where we will be providing planning advice as a result of the changes.


Disclaimer: This article is for general guidance only.  All taxation planning should only be undertaken after appropriate professional advice.  George Hay Chartered Accountants are registered to carry on audit work and regulated for a range of investment business activities by the Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales.

The information provided in this blog illustrates my opinions and experiences, it does not constitute advice and I do not accept responsibility for any actions taken or refrained from as a result of reading this post.

HM Revenue and Customs have gradually been trying to standardise the tax system across all the different taxes. From the 1st April 2010 further changes have come in to place in a bid to make the tax system more consistent.

Cross Compliance Inspections

Last year as part of the standardisation process HMRC introduced cross compliance checks enabling them to obtain information regarding various different taxes all at the same time. This meant that HMRC now have one set of powers giving them the ability to inspect records and consider the affect any information obtained has on various taxes such as Corporation Tax, VAT and PAYE, so if an error is found affecting one tax it could now have consequences across other taxes too.

From 1st April 2010 the list of taxes which can be inspected at the same time has been extended to cover almost all taxes imaginable. The major taxes of Income Tax, Corporation Tax, Capital Gains Tax, PAYE, VAT and CIS where all covered last year but this year majority of the remaining taxes have been added to the list, it now also includes Inheritance Tax, Stamp Duty Land Tax, and many more.

Time frames aligned

The standardisation process also covered the alignment of the amount of time a taxpayer has to make a claim and the amount of time HMRC have to make an assessment.  It now means that for Income Tax, Capital Gains Tax and Corporation Tax where the time limit for how far HMRC could previously go back was six years this has reduced to four years. However for VAT time limits have increased from three to four years.

 The changes to time limits largely took effect from 1 April 2010 so it could be well worth considering if a previously out of time claim could now be made or if a deadline is now nearing. Anyone needing to make an Income Tax repayment claim for earlier years should check the new deadlines to ensure they do not miss out.

Consistent and fair?

The new process is supposed to make the tax system more consistent and clearer for everyone to administer, but that remains to be seen.


Disclaimer: This article is for general guidance only.  All taxation planning should only be undertaken after appropriate professional advice.  George Hay Chartered Accountants are registered to carry on audit work and regulated for a range of investment business activities by the Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales.

The information provided in this blog illustrates my opinions and experiences, it does not constitute advice and I do not accept responsibility for any actions taken or refrained from as a result of reading this post.