Posts tagged ‘April’

May 1960 Pay SlipNew powers to tackle PAYE debtors

HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) will have new powers to tackle companies which fail to pay their employees’ income tax and national insurance contributions.

Upfront demands

From April, HMRC will be able to demand an upfront security from firms it deems to pose a serious risk of not paying.  In particular, HMRC will be targeting companies which deduct money from their employees’ pay packets but have no intention of paying it to the tax office.

The new measures are an extension of existing powers which HMRC has in respect of VAT, insurance premium tax and  environmental taxes.

It is hard to believe that this a “new” power as without it compliant taxpayers are not being treated fairly.

PenaltyPossible penalties

Businesses failing to provide a security will face a fine of up to £5,000 which will be enforceable by the courts.

HMRC have said that employers facing genuine payment difficulties will not be affected by the change.

Source: Total Investor website.

The information provided in this blog illustrates my opinions and experiences, it does not constitute advice and I do not accept responsibility for any actions taken or refrained from as a result of reading this post.

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PAYE notices of coding are notorious for being erroneous, but HMRC have surpassed themselves with this computer generated nightmare that not only leads to extra work and a lot of confusion but may even leave you paying too much tax.

Multiple Notices

In the last few months you may have received several Notices of Coding all showing different codes for the tax year 2010/11. There have been a number of instances where taxpayers have been receiving one tax code one day followed by a different one the next or even more than one code in one day. This has left many people bewildered and uncertain about exactly what tax code will be operated against their income and many of the codes issued are wrong anyway.

New HMRC  system

The problems have occurred as a result of HM Revenue & Customs recently introducing a new system for issuing coding notices called the National Insurance and PAYE Service (NPS). The new service has brought to light various discrepancies in their records and so they have been trying to rectify the errors, hence so many codes being issued all at once. They expect to complete their review by mid April 2010 which will hopefully bring an end to all the confusion.

Resolution?

Any problems occurring as a result of an incorrect code will ultimately be resolved at the end of the tax year once a taxpayer submits their 2010/11 Tax Return to HMRC. However if serious problems are not dealt with near the beginning of the tax year it could result in a large underpayment arising for some people which it may not be possible to collect via a later year’s tax code.  If you are not required to file a Tax Return, over or underpayments may go undetected for quite some time.

A careful review is necessary

In view of the problems which have occurred it is important that any codes received for 2010/11 are reviewed fully. If you believe that your code is incorrect you should either contact your advisor if you have one or HMRC as soon as possible.

Need help?

As agents we receive a copy of the majority of PAYE Coding Notices issued to our clients and therefore we are able solve many of the matters arising before problems begin to appear. We have discovered various reasons for an incorrect code but the problems particularly appear to have affected those with multiple employments. Close scrutiny of your code is therefore important.


Disclaimer: This article is for general guidance only.  All taxation planning should only be undertaken after appropriate professional advice.  George Hay Chartered Accountants are registered to carry on audit work and regulated for a range of investment business activities by the Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales.

The information provided in this blog illustrates my opinions and experiences, it does not constitute advice and I do not accept responsibility for any actions taken or refrained from as a result of reading this post.

Are you aware that the minimum retirement age is increasing to 55 from 6th April 2010?

This will mean that you will no longer be able to obtain an income or draw tax-free cash from your private pension before your 55th birthday except on the grounds of ill-health.

If you are aged 50 to 54 on 5th April 2010, you need to speak to your IFA as soon as possible to discuss your retirement plan as you will lose access to pension funds until you are 55 if you don’t act before 5th April 2010.  Please give your adviser time to administer your plans, there’s little point in approaching them at the end of March.

You have three options:

  1. Buy an annuity
  2. Transfer to an income drawdown scheme
  3. Do nothing and wait until your 55!

Retirement Road Sign with blue sky and clouds.Did you know that you do not need to physically retire to start taking income from your pension plan?  This means you could take your tax-free cash drawdown and reinvest it while you continue to work, giving you increased flexibility and control over your future.

Obviously taking cash from your fund will reduce its value so you need to talk to an adviser about the effect of this on the long term income you will derive from the plan.


The message here is clear, if you are 50 -54 years old and haven’t spoken to your IFA for some time, now is the time to do.  Don’t procrastinate, it could cost you dearly.


If you don’t have an IFA, I can recommend through personal and client experience, the advice of Chris Langdon at RHG 01438 345734. 

Please bear in mind that while accountants have a good working knowledge of retirement planning, most are not regulated or insured to give advice.  Make sure you are getting good quality advice bespoke to your needs from a professionally qualified  financial adviser.

The information provided in this blog illustrates my opinions and experiences, it does not constitute advice and I do not accept responsibility for any actions taken or refrained from as a result of reading this post.